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Peer Reviews

Elvenbaath Written and Illustrated by Dotty

The journey of an Elven girl and her friends through life after her dark visions of the future.
... Read It Now!
Neil Lisst's Review of Elvenbaath
Elvenbaath is a traditional comic strip by Canadian Tom Fraser, with main characters and a continuing storyline which weaves its way in and out of fantasy and reality based themes.
It begins with the dreams/nightmares that give flashes into the future of a saucy female elf named Mihoko Heirogawa. She is haunted by these night terrors of a robot that looms in her elf future. Atra is the only human in Elvenbaath, a young, dashing bearded college student, and he gets along well with Miho's mother, Mirra, an elf MILF, in her own right. There are dragonesque WURMS, hallucinogenic coffee, and magic contests along the way. Elvenbaath tells the tale of a young man's entry into a strange new universe, where he feels like a stranger in a strange land. It's another look at university life for the young university student, who often surely feels like he's entered another world, a strange yet magical and challenging world of fear and fun. There's the mystery of Aori, Atra's brother, and his disappearance by some sinister force. But we find out that the mystery is tied to a much larger problem: the whole universe is at stake! Tom Fraser began Elvenbaath in black and white, but went to some color a few weeks into the comic strip, and the color really adds to the cartoon. He combines black and white and color well throughout, telling a complex tale of youthful and ageless interactions with fears of frightful fiends and magical mystery mavens. As with many comics, the characters become more colorful, more developed, and grow into themselves as the artist learns them and understands them better himself. Read it, and start with the first installment, for it all ties together. ... read it now!




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