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Peer Reviews

Red KELSO By Gary Chaloner

1931: Ulysses 'Red' Kelso and his band of incorrigibles are on a desperate quest... from the concrete jungle of New York to the savage jungle of a lost world.
... Read It Now!
Dave Flora's Review of Red KELSO
If you're looking for a story straight out of the pulps of the 30's, this is the one to read!
Gary Chaloner has hit the mark with his webcomic "Red KELSO"! Exotic locals, fast women, square jaws and two-fisted action are on the menu for this story. The artwork is very slick and professional, giving the nod to the black-and-white serials that obviously inspired the series, and the story keeps the pace moving along. I'm a died in the wool pulp fan, but you don't have to know anything about the genre to really enjoy the ride Gary provides. So, "scamper off, you mugs an grab a read!" ... read it now!


Jacen Carpenter's Review of Red KELSO
Red Kelso is a full bodied red with an adventuresome aftertaste. Pulpy, with a hint of cheekiness, this Australian made webcomic is very satisfying.
Red Kelso is a rip-roaring, old fashioned adventure serial that reminds me of King Kong (the original) mixed with a dash of Indiana Jones and a sprinkling of Tintin. Gary Chaloner's crisp artwork is only matched by crisper dialogue with a real "pulp" feel to it. And like some other modern pulp tales, it doesn't feel forced. Gary has used a very subdued colour palette for the strip, but the use of vibrant red against the "sepia" tone really makes each page stand out. My favourite scene to date would have to be the salty "Cock Eye Bob" getting kicked in the face sending his false eye sailing across the dock with a simple "pop". I'm looking forward to see how the story will lead us from New York to the jungle standoff that we witness in the prologue. ... read it now!




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