Home Popular & New Today Swapmeet ·· About Sign Up Login ·· Help
Browse By Genre


24-Hour Comics

Action-Adventure

Alternative / Experimental

Anthropomorphic

Autobiographical / Slice-of-Life

Clip-Art Comics

College

Comic Jam

Comics About Comics

Detective / Police Drama / Crime

Drama

Fantasy

Food/Cooking

Gaming

Geek Culture

GLBT

High School/Middle School

Historical Fiction

Horror

Humor

Journal Comics / Drawn Blogs

Manga

Meta-Fiction

Military / Spy Fiction

Movie Parodies

Nature

Non-Fiction

Not Comics

One-Panel Gags

Other

Parodies of Other Comics

Photo Comics / Fumetti

Political / Satire

Pulp Action

Religion / Spirituality

Romance

Science Fiction

Sketchbooks / Galleries / Pin-Ups

Superhero

Supernatural/Magic

Surreal/Dream

Television Parodies

Thriller

Travelogue

Western

Wordless Comics

Workplace

Peer Reviews

Skully. by damian willcox

Growing up is hard. Growing up as Death is harder.
... Read It Now!
Brian Montfort's Review of Skully.
It just tickles your funny bone in the right way
Just to keep this short and sweet, Skully is terrific, its tragedy silly on all parts. I will be recommending this cartoon to anyone who needs a good laugh. ... read it now!


Craig Boldman's Review of Skully.
Skully ambles through his semblance of life, looks for love and becomes a rounded character, one gag at a time.
Unlike some of Damian Willcox's other series (Dorkboy; Workin' Jones) Skully is not a continuing story, but a series of single panels featuring the title character, a warm, fuzzy skeleton in a funeral-black suit and a cartoon-red bow tie. Most are gags, a few are sketches, some look like they'd make good tattoos. Even so, an interesting, layered personality for Skully begins to emerge through the cumulative reading. He's a sensitive, good-natured fellow, but with an edge (being, after all, deceased). Deadly but not quite malicious -- There's an innocence, or perhaps obliviousness, about the guy. Skully is a Casper The Friendly Ghost-type who's let the world get him down. Damian Willcox's artwork is especially appealing on this feature, with bold lines and a muted color palette to give a touch of the ol' melancholy. This one is really just getting off the ground, but worth following. I'd like to see Willcox feature Skully in a full-blown story, just to flesh him out a bit (Huh huh, 'flesh him out' -- He's a skeleton, geddit? Oh well--). ... read it now!




Write Your Own Review!
ComicSpace
logo

2002-2012

Thank you to all the creators and readers who have used ComicSpace over the years. Our time has come and gone, but we carry on ... elsewhere!